edited by me :)

edited by me :)

rhamphotheca:

wildlifecollective: Blue Button - Porpita porpita 

Porpita porpita, commonly known as the blue button, is a marine organism consisting of a colony of hydroids found in tropical waters from California to the tropical Pacific, the Atlantic and Indian oceans. It is often mistaken for a jellyfish, but although jellyfish and the blue buttons are part of the same phylum (Cnidaria), the blue button is part of the class Hydrozoa.
The blue button lives on the surface of the sea and consists of two main parts: the float and the hydroid colony. The hard golden-brown float is round, almost flat, and is about one inch wide. The hydroid colony, which can range from bright blue turquoise to yellow, resembles tentacles like those of the jellyfish. Each strand has numerous branchlets, each of which ends in knobs of stinging cells called nematocysts. The blue button sting is not powerful but may cause irritation if it comes in contact with human skin.
It plays a role in the food web, as its size makes it easy prey for several organisms. The blue button itself is a passive drifter, meaning that is feeds on both living and dead organisms that come in contact with it. It competes with other drifters for food and mainly feeds off of small fish, eggs, and zooplankton. The blue button has a single mouth located beneath the float which is used for both the intake of nutrients as well as the expulsion of wastes.
It is preyed on by Glaucus atlanticus (common names sea swallow, blue glaucus) and Violet sea-snails of the genus Janthina.Facts | Photo © Kathryn G. 

rhamphotheca:

wildlifecollectiveBlue Button - Porpita porpita 

Porpita porpita, commonly known as the blue button, is a marine organism consisting of a colony of hydroids found in tropical waters from California to the tropical Pacific, the Atlantic and Indian oceans. It is often mistaken for a jellyfish, but although jellyfish and the blue buttons are part of the same phylum (Cnidaria), the blue button is part of the class Hydrozoa.

The blue button lives on the surface of the sea and consists of two main parts: the float and the hydroid colony. The hard golden-brown float is round, almost flat, and is about one inch wide. The hydroid colony, which can range from bright blue turquoise to yellow, resembles tentacles like those of the jellyfish. Each strand has numerous branchlets, each of which ends in knobs of stinging cells called nematocysts. The blue button sting is not powerful but may cause irritation if it comes in contact with human skin.

It plays a role in the food web, as its size makes it easy prey for several organisms. The blue button itself is a passive drifter, meaning that is feeds on both living and dead organisms that come in contact with it. It competes with other drifters for food and mainly feeds off of small fish, eggs, and zooplankton. The blue button has a single mouth located beneath the float which is used for both the intake of nutrients as well as the expulsion of wastes.

It is preyed on by Glaucus atlanticus (common names sea swallow, blue glaucus) and Violet sea-snails of the genus Janthina.

Facts | Photo © Kathryn G. 

rhamphotheca:

A tiny tiny little Baluchistan Pygmy Jerboa (Salpingotulus michaelis), widely and probably incorrectly believed to be the smallest mammal in the world.

rhamphotheca:

A tiny tiny little Baluchistan Pygmy Jerboa (Salpingotulus michaelis), widely and probably incorrectly believed to be the smallest mammal in the world.

rhamphotheca:

The Baluchistan Pygmy Jerboa, aka Dwarf Three-toed Jerboa, (Salpingotulus michaelis) is a species of rodent in the Dipodidae family. It is the only species in the genus. Adults average only 4.4 cm head and body length, with the tail averaging 8 cm. Adult females weigh 3.75 grams. This nocturnal rodent is endemic to Pakistan… (read more: Wikipedia)
(photo via: MSNBC)

rhamphotheca:

The Baluchistan Pygmy Jerboa, aka Dwarf Three-toed Jerboa, (Salpingotulus michaelis) is a species of rodent in the Dipodidae family. It is the only species in the genus. Adults average only 4.4 cm head and body length, with the tail averaging 8 cm. Adult females weigh 3.75 grams. This nocturnal rodent is endemic to Pakistan… (read more: Wikipedia)

(photo via: MSNBC)

rhamphotheca:

The Etruscan shrew (Suncus etruscus) is the smallest known mammal by mass, weighing only about 1.8 grams on average. These shrews prefer warm and damp climates and are widely distributed in the belt between 10° and 30°N latitude stretching from Europe and North Africa up to Malaysia. They are relatively rare and are endangered in some countries... (read more: Wikipedia)  
(photo: Trebol-a)

rhamphotheca:

The Etruscan shrew (Suncus etruscus) is the smallest known mammal by mass, weighing only about 1.8 grams on average. These shrews prefer warm and damp climates and are widely distributed in the belt between 10° and 30°N latitude stretching from Europe and North Africa up to Malaysia. They are relatively rare and are endangered in some countries... (read more: Wikipedia)  

(photo: Trebol-a)